A blog by the Brick Factory The Brick Factory

Join our team! Fall Internship at Brick Factory

Do you want an internship that sets you up to succeed in the digital space? Are you looking to leave your next internship with a serious set of skills? Do you want to work with some pretty awesome people? You’ve come to the right place.

The Brick Factory plans and executes world-class digital campaigns for non-profits, trade associations, advocacy groups and brands. We believe in simple solutions, setting clear goals and objectives, and providing great service to our clients. We believe a good website or campaign is never done and the launch of a website is the beginning, not the end.

The Brick Factory interns will be responsible for supporting our Strategists in the conception, implementation and analysis of many digital initiatives. This includes website, social media, email, mobile and other digital marketing efforts that support new business, our products and client campaigns. This position calls for an individual with strong communication skills, analytic skills and creative thinking ability. This position requires a highly resourceful individual who can think on their feet and can focus under pressure.

What you’ll do:

  • Assist in running our clients’ digital programs. This involves an active engagement that is beyond management, ensuring that our projects ship on time, goals are set, tracked and met, and our clients are provided with clear, high level recommendations that help them succeed in the digital space.
  • Work in a small team environment. You’ll wear multiple hats, provide input and solutions, and work on multiple projects at one time.
  • Contribute to our blog. Brick by Brick is our soapbox to spread the thoughts and opinions of The Brick Factory. Once settled, you’ll be expected to develop new post ideas and contribute innovative content regularly.
  • Aid in new business and marketing efforts. At The Brick Factory everyone is involved in selling new work. Our interns have a large role in managing advertising and marketing campaigns. You will also be constantly looking to expand the work in our existing client portfolio while reaching out to new business prospects.
  • Make yourself and the company better. Meaning that you aren’t ever satisfied with the status quo and are constantly looking to improve yourself, the company and our clients.
  • Something you are interested in. We encourage our interns to tackle a self-driven project from conceptualization to launch during their time with us.

What you bring to the table:

  • You’re a fun person to be around.
  • You have a passion for work in the digital industry and are excited to learn new things.
  • You’re a problem solver. You would rather figure out the best solution than be told how to do it.
  • You’re organized. You can manage multiple projects at once and are dedicated to hitting deadlines.
  • You’re detail-oriented and you double check your work. Whether it’s making sure a document has standard formatting or looking through your code for typos, you know a project isn’t done unless it’s done well.
  • You have some experience with HTML, marketing and sales research, and analytics tools. A big plus if you have experience with CSS and JavaScript as well.
  • You have a strong writing background. Your communication skills are exceptional and you have experience creating and editing content for clients.
  • Have used or are willing to learn Adobe products such as InDesign, Dreamweaver and Photoshop.

What you can expect from us:

  • A metro accessible office in downtown Washington, DC.
  • A great work environment, with plenty of opportunity to learn.
  • Training and professional development opportunities.
  • Compensation during the extent of your internship.
  • A fun team of enthusiastic and talented people.
  • Occasional work activities, lunches, and happy hours.
  • Additional random perks and benefits.

The Details:
Dates: September 2015 through December 2015 (can be flexible for the right candidate)
20-25 hours a week in the office

Sound interesting? Take a look around our website, blog, Facebook and Twitter. If you think we’d be a good fit please send a resume and cover letter to analystjobs@thebrickfactory.com.


Email Marketing: 5 Big Mistakes

How many unread emails are in your inbox right now?

I’ve got Groupon, Linkedin, The Boston Globe, my alma mater, Ticketmaster, Rent the Runway, Zipcar, Proflowers, Bluehost, and Seamless. I could go on.

I’ll delete most without opening.
The ones I do open? I skim them. Five seconds, tops. Then I delete.
An email that actually convinces me to open, read, and click is pretty rare.

Well…I’m busy.

I’m not the only one. Your followers are just as likely to trash your email.
Open rates vary by industry, but, on average, it’s about 20 percent.

Even people who do open your emails aren’t reading every word. They’re just as likely to skim as I am.
Users spend only 15 to 20 seconds reading the emails they do open.

But email is very important. For every dollar spent, the average return on investment is about $44. And for nonprofit fundraising campaigns, each usable email can net $12.46 in revenue a year.

You need to send emails.

But how do you keep people from clicking the trash can? How do you get users excited about your emails? How do you get the results you want?


  • Have something to say.
  • Say it quickly.
  • Make it easy.

With that framework in mind, here are the five biggest mistakes I see time and time again, mistakes that cause my cursor to hover over delete:



I just laid down some enticing stats about how your email list helping to generate revenue. But pause for a one second.

Your email list is not an ATM.

Every email in that database of yours belongs to a real person, a real person who is kinda interested in your organization.

You can’t send out email after email asking people to donate or register or whatever. Before someone will take action for you, you need to build your relationship and demonstrate your value.

Take donations…
If I’m going to donate I have to go get my purse, dig through who-knows-what to find my wallet, pull out my card, type in a sixteen-digit number, type in my address…it’s a lot. I have to have some pretty strong feelings for you before I’ll donate.

Instead of just peppering your list with donation pleas, you need to give them what they want. Why did they sign up for your list in the first place? What do you have to say that is relevant to them? What do they care about? Think about what your audience wants and give it to them.

Once you’ve got that going, you can send an email asking users to take action. But keep a good proportion.
For every five emails you send, four should be content your audience cares about.

And speaking of sending…


Sending Too Much

Tuesday and Thursday are still considered the best days to send your email because the open rates tend to be higher. However, everyone got the message. These days are becoming very crowded. It’s worth exploring other days, looking at your data, and seeing what works best for your audience.

Every audience is different.
I’ve got some clients that send an email every single day. I’ve got others that send an email once a month.

How often does your audience want to receive emails from you? How often can you send an email without them becoming annoyed?

It really can depend.
But a good place to start? Once a week.

If you’re seeing tons of unsubscribes and a low open rate, try sending fewer emails.
Interested in sending more emails? If you have the content to support it, try a pilot program sending emails twice a week. After this has been going for a while, check your stats to determine what your audience likes.

But even within a single list you might have some users that want more and some users that want list.
Which is why list segmentation is essential.

You’re going to have users who want emails once a day. Some, once a week. Others, once a month. Many email marketing platforms allow you to have an unsubscribe page where users can select their frequency. When a user is annoyed that you’re blowing up their inbox, instead of unsubscribing entirely they can just select “once a month.” Instead of losing leads, you’re letting them tell you exactly what they want.


Subject line

Should I delete an email or open it?
Often, it depends on the subject line.

In your subject line you’re explaining what you have to say and why it’s relevant to your audience. You’re explaining, immediately, the value of your email and how it’s something the user wants to read.

So first and foremost, your subject line needs to be relevant.

It also needs to be the right length.

A good subject line is short – it gets to the point. It displays well in your user’s mail clients and allows a little bit of a content preview.
I recommend keeping your subject line under 50 characters, including spaces.

Also, keep in mind that your subject lines can be big triggers for automatic spam filters. Using all-caps or special characters (including exclamation points) increases the chance you’ll be marked as spam.


Too much text

Everyone is busy. Most users are going to spend only 15 seconds or so looking at your email.

So, it’s safe to assume your users are not going to read your four paragraphs of text. (And this is especially sad since it took you quite a while to write.)

You need to get to the point right away.
And yes – your email should have just one point.
Say what you need to say, say it briefly, and provide users with links to more info.

Assume your users are skimming. Break up your text to make it easier for them to get the most important information quickly. Headings and bullets are your best friends. Find a way to make your links stand out. Use buttons, video thumbnails, or contrasting colors. If the purpose of your email is to send the user to your website, they should be able to find that link immediately.

I should note that you should be careful about relying solely on images to draw attention. Some programs, like Outlook, block images automatically.


Ignoring Mobile

With mobile, load time is always a concern. If a page takes more than a few seconds to load, a user will give up. This is also true for emails on mobile.

What’s the number one way users are reading their email?
Their iphone.

Today, more email is read on tablets and phones than on computers.

So why are so many people ignoring mobile?

You’ve likely heard about responsive design – how a webpage resizes and realigns content to display well on any device. But fewer people are using responsive design in their emails.

Often, a design that looks great on a computer will be unreadable on a phone. Sometimes the fonts are too small, sometimes the columns are too narrow.

You likely have a responsive template – whether it’s custom or out-of-the-box, most designers are making email templates responsive. But if you’re managing your own content, it’s likely not responsive.

Which means you need to test. And test. And test. Before you send an email, make sure you can read it on mobile.

Social Ads

Navigating Social Advertising

12 years ago, Friendster debuted.
Since then, the number of social networks has exploded.
And in the past few years, so too have the opportunities for social advertising: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest, Google+.

It can be a little overwhelming.

Americans spend 37 minutes each day on social media, so social ads are a great opportunity to help you connect with your audience. But should you be using them? And which platforms should you put money into? How do you keep from getting bogged down in all your options? And how do you get the results you want?


So what is social advertising:

It’s advertising. It’s on a social networking site.
You’re paying to reach people who don’t already follow/like/whatever you.

For a lot of companies, social ads are part of the overall digital advertising strategy which might include Google AdWords and a few well-placed banner ads. (Yup, banner ads are coming back. Maybe.) But if you’re not advertising on social yet, there are a few key reasons to consider it:

  • Many social ads don’t look like ads.
    As a society, we’re flooded with advertising, so we’ve trained ourselves to tune the noise out. Automatically, we don’t pay attention to most solicitations. But social platforms have found a way to get through your filter and make you take a second look.
    Many ads are either carefully crafted to look like content or are actual content from your pages. Take the Levis Instagram ad below. If it didn’t have the “sponsored” icon, it would look like just another Instagram post in your feed.
    Levis Instagram Ad
  • You have many different ways to target your audience.
    Geotargeting, or serving your ads to users based on their geographic location, revolutionized advertising and made digital far more efficient than print for many marketers. In the last five years we’ve seen it used in video, display, and search ads.
    However, social took targeting even further so you can really hone in on your target audience. Social networks have access to information beyond location so, depending on the platform, you can target by gender, age, interests, behavior, and more. On Twitter, you can even target anyone who follows your competitors.
    Twitter Targeting

But, as we said, there are a lot of different social networks to advertise on. Should you be on any? Should you be on them all? Or maybe just a select few?

First you have to consider:

  1. What is the goal of your ad?
    Do you want more people on your organization’s page? Then you should put money into ads where you have a strong presence and strong content. (What’s the point of having followers if they have nothing to follow?) Are you trying to get people to go to your website? Ad types with strong calls-to-action are best for this.
  2. What resources do you have?
    First, images. The old adage is true; a picture is worth a thousand words. And all the big sites, even Twitter, have become more image-centric as of late. But images that work on Pinterest don’t always work on Facebook. Do you want to use a large photo? An infographic? An animated GIF?
    Second, your (rough) budget. Can you throw $40 at this? Or $4,000? Or $400,000?
  3. Where is your audience?
    Trying to sell to women who make a lot of money? You should be on Pinterest. Urban millenials? Instagram.

Once you have answered those questions, take a look at what’s out there and see what matches up.

10 best trade association websites

10 Best Trade Association Websites

What makes a good website? About a hundred different things. But what’s a good start? Good organization, good design, good content.

Brick Factory is based in D.C., where you can’t go a block without passing half-a-dozen trade associations, so we were curious: which ones have the best websites?

What did we find? Very good examples of organization, design, and content.

We started with 50 of the largest trade associations, but narrowed it down to 10.

Who rose to the top? Take a look.


10. The Endocrine Society

The Endocrine Society has a good website overall, but they made this list because of how user-friendly the site is. We like that you can browse content by “who you are.” This option is right at the top, right in the middle: you can’t miss it.

Endocrine Society Website



9. Mortgage Bankers Association

It’s organized, it’s attractive, it’s easy to navigate. Overall – a job well done. Notice how all the content on the homepage is spaced perfectly and fits into a grid; the standardized height and width for each block makes this website design clean and effective.

Mortgage Bankers Association



8. American Association for the Advancement of Science

Great calls-to-action! “Become a Member” stands out clearly without being over-the-top. AAAS uses red to draw your eye to the most important things on the page. But why does this really work? Because it’s the same red they use in their logo.

American Association for the Advancement of Science



7. American Chemical Society

ACS has an attractive and well organized website, but what sets them apart is their content. It’s original, it’s engaging, it’s fun. Cool Science? Molecule of the Week? Chemistry Quiz? We’re in!

American Chemical Society



6. National Rifle Association

The NRA is another trade association that is making a large investment in the production of original content, particularly video. Their website features video series targeted at diverse audiences, like women and urban youth, that will keep visitors coming back.

National Rifle Association



5. The Optical Society

OSA does a great job with subtlety – the header provides just the right amount of depth. Also, the scrolling updates could have come across as cheesy, but it actually works! It’s small enough and the animation is slow enough that doesn’t take over the page. Oh – and check out the image gallery, great content.

The Optical Society


4. Aerospace Industries Association

This website is just beautiful. Every time you refresh you get a new, huge image of a plane or helicopter. A very unique approach for a trade association.

Aerospace Industries Association


3. National School Boards Association

NSBA has done everything right. A smooth, larger-than-average slider makes the visual content the focus of the page. A clear headline tells you who they are right away. And using icons for their primary initiatives was a good, attention-getting touch.

National School Boards Association


2. InfoComm International

What do we really love about InfoComm International? Look how much is on their homepage… not that much, right? InfoComm has a great content strategy – keeping it simple.

InfoComm International


1. American Diabetes Association

This is one of the only websites on our list that doesn’t have a slider. The American Diabetes Association has an attractive, modern website that uses visuals and icons very well. Also, their original content is outstanding: relevant, entertaining, and tailored to their audience. We love the featured recipes!

American Diabetes Association